COX, Tarnya

Tarnya Cox

Research interests

  • Repellents for vertebrate pests using predator scents
  • Vertebrate pest management
  • Animal behaviour

Background

Tarnya Cox is a research officer with the Vertebrate Pest Research Unit in the NSW Department of Primary Industries.

Tarnya joined the VPRU in 2010 as part of the RHD-boost project team which aims to improve biological control of the introduced European rabbit. Her role is to develop a monitoring and release strategy for new virus strains, to collect rabbit population information from across Australia and to assist in the development of a decision framework for the release of new biological control agents for rabbits.

Tarnya has participated in research projects on a variety of species including flying foxes and rodents in northern Queensland, mice in South Australia, grey squirrels in the UK and rodents in Cambodia.

Tarnya's previous research has included identifying prey species of owl through bone fragments, the role of flying foxes in the transmission of Leptospirosis, baiting rates for mouse plagues, trap effectiveness for grey squirrels and the use of predator scents to deter vertebrate pests from palatable feed.

Qualifications

  • Assoc.Dip (Wilderness Reserves and Wildlife) – University of Qld 1997
  • B.App.Sc. (Wildlife Biology)(Hons) – University of Qld 2003
  • PhD Wildlife Ecology and Management – University of Qld 2010

Current projects

  • RHD-boost for improved rabbit management
  • The role of rabbit kittens in virus transmission
  • The effectiveness of spotlight techniques in population monitoring

Recent publications

Prow NA, Hewlett EK, Faddy HM, Coiacetto F, Wang W, Cox T, Hall RA and Bielefeldt-Ohmann H (2014) The Australian public is still vulnerable to emerging virulent strains of West Nile virus In: Emergin zoonoses: eco-epidemiology, involved mechanisms and public health implications. Frontiers Research Topic Ebook

Cox TE, Murray PJ, Bengsen A, Hall PJ and Li X (2014) Do fecal odors from native and non-native predators cause a habitat shift among macropods? Wildlife Society Bulletin, DOI: 10.1002/wsb.509

Liu J, Fordham D, Cooke B, Cox T, Mutze G and Strive T (2014) Climate influences the distribution and prevalence of non-pathogenic rabbit calicivirus in Australia - Implications for rabbit disease ecology and population management. PLOS ONE, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0113976

Prow NA, Hewlett EK, Faddy HM, Coiacetto F, Wang W, Cox T, Hall RA and Bielefeldt-Ohmann H (2014) The Australian public is still vulnerable to emerging virulent strains of West Nile virus Frontiers in Public Health: Epidemiology, DOI: 10.3389/fpubh.2014.00146

Bengsen A and Cox T (2014) The role of rabbit and other invasive herbivore control in reducing Australia’s greenhouse gas emissions. PestSmart Toolkit publication, Invasive Animals Cooperative Research Centre, Canberra, Australia.

Cox T, Strive T, Mutze G, West P and Saunders G (2013) Rabbit Review: Benefits of rabbit biocontrol in Australia. PestSmart Toolkit publication, Invasive Animals Cooperative Research Centre, Canberra, Australia.

Cox TE, Murray PJ, Hall PJ and Li X (2012) Manipulating resource use by goats with predator fecal odors. Wildlife Society Bulletin, DOI: 10.1002/wsb.215

Cox TE, Murray PJ and Hall GP 2010 Pest responses to odors from predators fed a diet of target species conspecifics and heterospecifics Journal of Wildlife Management 74(8): 1737–1744

Cox TE, Smythe LD and Leung LK-P 2005 Flying foxes as carriers of pathogenic Leptospira species Journal of Wildlife Diseases 41(4): 753–757

Google Scholar Citations

Orcid.org

Fields of research

  • 050103 Invasive Species Ecology
  • 060201 Behavioural Ecology
  • 060801 Animal Behaviour
  • 060399 Evolutionary Biology not elsewhere classified

Australian Bureau of Statistics classifications

Keyword/phrase list of research interests

  • Vertebrate pests
  • Animal behaviour
  • Wildlife biology
  • Environmental management
  • Monitoring techniques
  • Wildlife disease

Contact details

Email: tarnya.cox@dpi.nsw.gov.au