Plague locust image gallery

High density locust swarms trapped against trees lining the Lachlan River caused major damage to lucerne in this 2004/05 plague
Not all locust damage can be seen from the edge of crops.  This photo shows the importance of going into crops to check for locust egg beds and locust activity.
Locust bands decimating a Coonamble farmers crop in its early stages.
Adult locusts like to lay eggs in very hard surfaces.  You can just make out the abdomens of many of the adults in this picture pushed into the hard soil where the eggs will be deposited.
Young 1 instar locust nymphs are incredibly tiny (about 3mm in length).  These locusts will begin to band in approximately 2–3 weeks which is the optimal time to apply control measures.
Open pods at a locust egg bed
Banding locusts
Plague locust eggpod
Plague locust nymphal band moving through pasture
High density locust swarm over a wheat crop
Landholders examining locust eggbeds near Trangie (Sep. 2010, photo from Central West LHPA)
Examining an eggpod on a property near Trangie (Sep. 2010, photo from Central West LHPA)
Dense locust band on a property at Carinda.
Dense locust band on a property at Carinda.
Image 15. Dense locust band on a property at Carinda.
Dense locust band on property at Carinda
Aerial spraying of locusts near Bourke
Pilot Dave McAnally and Minister for Primary Industries, Steve Whan, discuss aerial spraying plans in Bourke
Low density locust swarm found near Brewarrina, in the state's north-west (October 2010)
Spur-throated locust at Parkes
Cotton crop damaged by Spur-throated locusts, Warren
Spur-throated locust on citrus tree
Image 23. Spur-throated locust
Image 24. Spur-throated locust
High density locust swarms trapped against trees lining the Lachlan River caused major damage to lucerne in this 2004/05 plague
Not all locust damage can be seen from the edge of crops.  This photo shows the importance of going into crops to check for locust egg beds and locust activity.
Locust bands decimating a Coonamble farmers crop in its early stages.
Adult locusts like to lay eggs in very hard surfaces.  You can just make out the abdomens of many of the adults in this picture pushed into the hard soil where the eggs will be deposited.
Young 1 instar locust nymphs are incredibly tiny (about 3mm in length).  These locusts will begin to band in approximately 2–3 weeks which is the optimal time to apply control measures.
Open pods at a locust egg bed
Banding locusts
Plague locust eggpod
Plague locust nymphal band moving through pasture
High density locust swarm over a wheat crop
Landholders examining locust eggbeds near Trangie (Sep. 2010, photo from Central West LHPA)
Examining an eggpod on a property near Trangie (Sep. 2010, photo from Central West LHPA)
Dense locust band on a property at Carinda.
Dense locust band on a property at Carinda.
Image 15. Dense locust band on a property at Carinda.
Dense locust band on property at Carinda
Aerial spraying of locusts near Bourke
Pilot Dave McAnally and Minister for Primary Industries, Steve Whan, discuss aerial spraying plans in Bourke
Low density locust swarm found near Brewarrina, in the state's north-west (October 2010)
Spur-throated locust at Parkes
Cotton crop damaged by Spur-throated locusts, Warren
Spur-throated locust on citrus tree
Image 23. Spur-throated locust
Image 24. Spur-throated locust