What happens after something is listed?

Once a species, population or ecological community has been listed as threatened, several actions can be taken to assist with its recovery:

Community awareness, involvement and support are also crucial to the success of any recovery program.

Priorities Action Statement

The Priorities Action Statement sets out strategies for the recovery of threatened species, populations and endangered ecological communities. It also creates strategies for the management of key threatening processes. The Priorities Action Statement establishes relative priorities for recovery and threat abatement strategies and reports on the performance and implementation of these strategies. The Priorities Action Statement sets out a clear timetable for recovery and threat abatement planning and achievement. More information on the Priorities Action Statement.

Impact assessment

If a planned development or activity is likely to have any impact on a threatened species, an assessment of the potential impacts must be made. More information on impact assessments.

Ministerial Orders

The Minister may make an order authorising a class of persons to carry out an activity that may result in harm to a threatened species, population or ecological community or damage to their habitat. For example, a ministerial order may permit continuation of recreational fishing activities within an endangered ecological community or for threatened species that have been stocked in to impoundments such as silver perch.

Section 221IH of the Fisheries Management Act 1994 requires the Director-General of DPI to keep a register of ministerial orders containing copies of all orders and interim orders in force. The register is also available for public inspection during ordinary business hours at the Port Stephens Fisheries Institute.

Recovery plans

Once a species, population or ecological community has been listed as threatened, the Department of Primary Industries may prepare a recovery plan. These plans are designed to return the species, population or ecological community to a point where its survival in nature is assured. Recovery plans include background information on the biology, habitat and distribution as well as threats faced by the species.

The Department of Primary Industries is required to exhibit draft recovery plans and seek public comment before the NSW Minister for Primary Industries approves the final plan.

Procedures for the production of a plan are specified in the Act and involve:

  • public exhibition - when the community is invited to make submissions on the plan
  • consideration of the submissions by the Department of Primary Industries
  • approval of the final plan by the NSW Minister for Primary Industries.

View draft and final recovery plans

Threat abatement plans

The Department of Primary Industries may prepare a threat abatement plan for each listed key threatening process. A threat abatement plan includes background information on the species and habitats affected by the Key Threatening Process and the work being done to manage the impacts. Threat abatement plans outline actions needed to eliminate or manage the key threatening process, and identifies the authorities responsible for carrying out those actions.

When preparing a threat abatement plan, the Department of Primary Industries consults extensively with scientific experts, government departments, land managers and members of the community. Once a draft plan has been drawn up, it's placed on public exhibition and the community is invited to make submissions. All submissions are considered before the plan is forwarded to the Minister for Primary Industries for approval.

Threat abatement plans must be reviewed periodically. Anyone can make a submission about a threat abatement plan at any time, and their submission will be considered in the review process.

Putting threat abatement plans into effect

The Department of Primary Industries leads the implementation of threat abatement plans to reduce threats to fish and marine vegetation. But often the cooperation of other public authorities is needed to manage these threats effectively. If other authorities agree to help, they will be identified in the threat abatement plan.

Threat abatement planning coordinates the work of the Department of Primary Industries, public authorities, other organisations and the community.

Threat abatement plans also influence other planning processes, and must be taken into account by public authorities when they make decisions. For example, local councils and other public authorities may need to consider a threat abatement plan when assessing development proposals.

View plans currently on public exhibition

Critical habitat

The Department of Primary Industries may identify critical habitat - the areas of habitat (land and/or water) that are crucial to the survival of particular threatened species, populations and communities. This involves extensive consultation with the Fisheries Scientific Committee, government agencies, landholders and the wider community. Once these areas have been declared they're recorded on a register of critical habitat.

Critical habitat affects the development assessment process. If a proposed development will occur on critical habitat, a species impact statement has to be prepared.