Kangaroo management FAQ

Do landholders still need a licence to harm kangaroos?

Yes, landholders or managers need a licence to harm kangaroos if they intend to harm kangaroos, wallabies or wallaroos on their property to mitigate damage or for public safety purposes.

If the property is in a commercial harvest zone, landholders will require a commercial licence and they may also engage a licensed commercial harvester to remove kangaroos from their property.

How do I qualify to help landholders manage kangaroos?

Persons with a valid firearms licence and appropriate firearms can assist landholders who have a licence to harm issued by the National Parks & Wildlife Service (NPWS).

Participating shooters must also read the comprehensive Volunteer Non-Commercial Kangaroo Shooters Best Practice Guide (PDF, 524.71 KB) and comply with the principles for humane and ethical shooting of kangaroo species.

What is the LLS Shooters Register?

Local Land Services (LLS) is establishing a register of commercial harvesters, professional shooters and volunteer shooters who are willing to assist landholders to harm kangaroos.

Volunteer shooters holding a current firearms licence with appropriate firearms are invited to list their contact details, training and experience on a Shooters Register that may be accessed by landholders requiring assistance.

Contact LLS on 1300 795 299 or use their online form to place your details on the Shooters Register.

Can I use the public liability insurance attached to my NSW Game Hunting Licence?

No, kangaroos are not listed in the Game and Feral Animal Control Act 2002. The $25 million public liability insurance attached to each standard licence only covers licence holders for species listed in the Act.

What methods may be used to harm kangaroos?

The National Code of Practice for the Humane Shooting of Kangaroos and Wallabies for Non-Commercial Purposes and the Volunteer Non-Commercial Kangaroo Shooters Best Practice Guide (PDF, 524.71 KB) specifies acceptable methods of shooting kangaroos, including:

  • the type of firearms and ammunition that must be used
  • how shooting must be conducted (shooting from moving vehicles or helicopters is not permitted)
  • where to aim to ensure a sudden and humane death
  • procedures to minimise pain and suffering of shot animals and euthanase pouch young and dependent young.

Do kangaroo carcasses still need to be tagged?

No, from Wednesday 8 August 2018, carcass tags are not required to be attached to carcasses under current and new licences to harm kangaroos for non-commercial purposes.

Commercial tags are still required for kangaroos harvested by licensed kangaroo harvesters.

Can I use the carcasses under a licence to harm kangaroos?

Yes, the ‘shoot and let lie’ condition does not apply from Wednesday 8 August 2018 for new and existing licences to harm kangaroos for non-commercial purposes.

The changes allow landholders and shooters to use the carcass for any secondary purpose, however a carcass must not be sold, swapped or traded.

Do the changes apply to harming other native animals?

No. The changes only apply to licences to harm red kangaroos, eastern grey kangaroos, western grey kangaroos and wallaroos. There are no changes to licences to harm other species of native animals.

How will the kangaroo population be sustainably managed?

The NSW Kangaroo Management Plan for the commercial harvest program establishes a quota to ensure kangaroo populations in the harvest zones remain ecologically sustainable.

The quota is set at 17% of the population for red kangaroos and 15% for eastern and western grey kangaroos and wallaroos.

Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH) will closely monitor the total number of kangaroos authorised to be culled under licences to harm kangaroos non commercially and the number harvested under the commercial harvest program.

If the combined cull and harvest approaches the ecologically sustainable quota, OEH may adjust the maximum limits on the number of kangaroos that can be harmed under licences to harm kangaroos.

How will animal welfare be managed?

All shooting of kangaroos and wallabies must comply with the National Code of Practice for the Humane Shooting of Kangaroos and Wallabies for Non-Commercial Purposes to ensure kangaroos are killed in a way that minimises pain and suffering.

The Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act 1979 also applies to harming kangaroos in NSW.

Compliance with this Act is monitored and enforced by the NSW Police Force, the NSW RSPCA and the Animal Welfare League NSW.