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Grapevine Pinot Gris Virus (GPGV)

GPGV in Australia

Grapevine leaves on a stem, leaves are deformed and mottled yellow and green. (Dr. Pasquale Saldarelli, University Of Bari)

Symptoms of grapevine pinot gris virus (GPGV) have been observed overseas as early as 2003, however, the cause of the symptoms was not known until 2012 when advances in diagnostic technology allowed the virus to be identified.

GPGV was detected in Australia in 2017. The plant virus was detected in vineyards across New South Wales, Victoria and South Australia and poses no threat to human health or food safety. Due to the wide spread of the disease, eradication was not feasible and GPGV is now considered established in Australia.

Disease description

GPGV is a plant virus which affects many grapevine varieties, not just pinot gris. Symptoms of GPGV include delayed budburst, leaf mottling, leaf deformation and shortened internodes. Symptoms can resemble mite damage, and in some varieties infected vines show no symptoms.

GPGV is thought to be spread in infected propagating material and by grapevine bud and blister mites (Colomerus vitis). Grapevine bud and blister mites are established and widespread plant pests in Australia. GPGV is not spread by movement of people or machinery.

Common weeds such as fat hen (Chenopodium album) and white campion (Silene latifolia) can act as reservoirs for the virus.

For more information on GPGV see the Australian Wine Research Institute fact sheet.

Management options

Removing infected vines and controlling mites and weeds will help prevent further spread of this plant virus.

Biosecurity actions

Even if you do not suspect GPGV in your vines, you should include biosecurity actions in your day to day activities to help prevent future biosecurity threats

  • Use rootstock and budwood of high health status sourced from reputable suppliers
  • Control mites
  • Regularly inspect vines
  • Ensure all staff and visitors are instructed in and adhere to your on-farm hygiene practices
  • Keep records of the source of plant material, vine health, treatments and inspections